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Agriculture

When purchasing your next quart of strawberries, Doug Hildebrand wants you to remember your local farmer. For almost 30 years, Hildebrand has operated Old Milan Canal Farm outside of conventional farming practices, refusing to depend on chemical applications for high yields. Listen to the story of the once multi-million dollar entrepreneur, and his efforts to re-create a lost culture in Erie County, OH.


Listen to Part 1


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Old Milan Canal Farm | Podcast | Part 2

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Doug Hildebrand at his farm on 2904 E. Mason Rd Milan, OH. photo: Joshua B. Pribanic

An eye (bottom left corner) cut from a potato to be sown. photo: Joshua B. Pribanic

A potato plant. photo: Joshua B. Pribanic

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When purchasing your next quart of strawberries, Doug Hildebrand wants you to remember your local farmer. For almost 30 years, Hildebrand has operated Old Milan Canal Farm outside of conventional farming practices, refusing to depend on chemical applications for high yields. Listen to the story of the once multi-million dollar entrepreneur, and his efforts to re-create a lost culture in Erie County, OH.


(Note: this recording may take a minute to load: please be patient. Also, some recordings do not play well on built-in computer speakers; and would require headphones or a strong set of speakers attached to your computer.)

Old Milan Canal Farm | Podcast

Subscribe to our free Podcast “On The Wire” to receive weekly audio trimmings of recordings in Erie County, OH.


Doug Hildebrand talking with Don Corley about agriculture and the economy at Mr. Smith's Coffeehouse in downtown Sandusky, OH. photo: The Erie Wire

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First in a three part series, The Erie Wire interviews innovative farmer, Joel Salatin, who was the silver-lining featured in the sobering documentary Food, Inc., released in 2008. Joel’s production practices and clever marketing methods have attracted a large consumer following – his farm serves more than 1,500 families and 10 retail outlets – and even Chipotle, a billion dollar fast food chain dedicated to serving sustainably raised food. Joel was sponsored by Chipotle to be a keynote speaker at the 2010 OEFFA conference that took place in Granville, Ohio. In his speech titled “Everything I Want to do is Illegal” he discussed the local food movement challenge – from zoning to food safety to insurance, and regulatory hurdles designed and implemented to benefit industrial food models – and called for guerrilla marketing campaigns and other solutions to grow access to nutritionally-superior, sustainably raised food.


Listen to Part 2


Listen to Part 3


(Note: this recording may take a minute to load: please be patient. Also, some recordings do not play well on built-in computer speakers; and would require headphones or a strong set of speakers attached to your computer.)

Joel Salatin Part 1

Subscribe to our free Podcast “On The Wire” to receive weekly audio trimmings of recordings in Erie County, OH.


Joel Salatin preparing for his speech at the 2010 OEFFA conference.





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As the average age of an American farmer is pushing 60 years, the hope that the field of agriculture would be appealing enough for a younger generation to return to family traditions is one that most farmers hold dear, even as they encourage their children to explore the world and their career options. Bill Gammie of Quarry Hill Orchards in Berlin Heights, discusses his thoughtful perspective on this issue with The Erie Wire.

Quarry Hill Orchards has been a part of the Gammie family since the Great Depression. Originally a vegetable farm, fruit tree crops became the primary source of income because of the well-drained soils and elevation in this part of Erie County – the farm is three miles from the coast, with Lake Erie visible from the highest point on the farm. Quarry Hill recently updated its enterprise with a winery, partnering with award-winning winemaker Mac McLelland. With the lake effect’s extended season, they use their peaches, plums, apples and cherries from the orchard along with select varieties of cold hardy grapes from their own vineyard in artisan wine making. This April, the new winery will be open to the public, overlooking the vineyards. A wine bar will also be open weekend evenings – featuring light cuisine and live entertainment while patrons can enjoy a self-guided tour of the underground wine cellar.

Quarry Hill Winery partner, Bill Gammie, talking about his experience with the ag-link program at a conference hosted by the Ohio Department of Treasury.

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12 Comments leave one →
  1. Pamela permalink
    February 1, 2010 10:48 pm

    Your website is wonderful. I am researching the salient points involved in the upcoming Supreme Court hearing of Monsanto v. Geertson Seed Farms, No. 09-475. I am trying to put these salient points as succinctly as I can in an email to all my friends. The EIS of this case has a public comment period which ends Feb. 16. Look into responding if you can. One thing I don’t grasp is why ANY farmer, even large farmers stand to profit in any way from GMO seeds, i.e.: The American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Corn Growers Association, the Biotechnology Industry Organization and the American Seed Trade Association. I’d appreciate any insight to this puzzlement asap if you can.

    God Bless you.

  2. February 7, 2010 1:55 am

    Pamela:

    The organizations you have listed share a common denominator; they are all controlled by the same people. You need to take the time to search their PAC connections and their CEO’s and Directors. This will uncover the tentacles of their far reaching plotters. The history is there but you have to connect the dots and establish the links in their corporate chain. What you will find may astound you. This link will give you a starting point. http://archives.foodsafety.ksu.edu/agnet/1998/6-1998/ag-6-29-98-2.txt

  3. April 19, 2010 11:46 am

    Come see “Fresh” Wed., April 21 at 2:15 p.m. & 7:15 p.m. at the Mary D’Angelo Performing Arts Center located on the Mercyhurst College campus. Fresh celebrates the farmers, thinkers and business people across America who are re-inventing our food system. This film is sponsored by the Whole Foods Cooperative. A panel discussion will follow the film. Also at 6:30 p.m., before the evening film, will be our final Brew & View of the season! Come and enjoy a micro brew sampling along with some yummy food from the Café at the Whole Foods Cooperative. Must be 21+ to enter reception. Call (814) 824-3000 for more information or visit pac.mercyhurst.edu

  4. May 19, 2010 9:28 pm

    Your website is wonderful. I am researching the salient points involved in the upcoming Supreme Court hearing of Monsanto v. Geertson Seed Farms, No. 09-475. I am trying to put these salient points as succinctly as I can in an email to all my friends. The EIS of this case has a public comment period which ends Feb. 16. Look into responding if you can. One thing I don’t grasp is why ANY farmer, even large farmers stand to profit in any way from GMO seeds, i.e.: The American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Corn Growers Association, the Biotechnology Industry Organization and the American Seed Trade Association. I’d appreciate any insight to this puzzlement asap if you can.
    +1

Trackbacks

  1. Why Local Food? « Local Food Sandusky
  2. Backyard Gardens: Soil and Compost Basics « Local Food Sandusky
  3. Backyard Gardens: Seeds and Starters to Companion Plants and Wonder Bugs « Local Food Sandusky
  4. Urban Food Gardening & Edible Landscaping « The Erie Wire
  5. ERIE COUNTY, OH – Bayer Admits It Cannot Control GE Crop Contamination « The Erie Wire
  6. ERIE COUNTY, OH – Transgenics in the Food Market | Editorial « The Erie Wire
  7. ERIE COUNTY, OH – Interview: Old Milan Canal Farm | Part 1 | Podcast « The Erie Wire
  8. ERIE COUNTY, OH – Interview: Old Milan Canal Farm | Part 2 | Podcast « The Erie Wire

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